Let's Talk

It’s not just on Twitter, it’s for Twitter,” sounds a little bit too much like “I’m not a regular mom, I’m a cool mom” for me to take it entirely seriously, but it’s not a bad summary of the idea behind Buzzfeed’s new morning show, AM to DM. It’s streaming live on Twitter every weekday morning at 10am, and strives to be a new kind of morning show: one for the internet.

And yet, as Slate pointed out, most morning shows and late night talk shows are already effectively made for the internet. AM to DM doesn’t have anything particularly groundbreaking in format yet. Two hosts have on guests and discuss current events, a tried-and-true formula. They have segments in which they read “Fire Tweets” and decide on a “ManCrushMonday” (#coolmom), but these bits not yet engaging enough to stand out, nor do they distinguish themselves from from late-night talk shows that do segments in the same vein.

AM to DM does have a significant advantage in courting a young audience, however, in their choice of medium. In an age when many people are cutting their cable subscriptions, or opting never to get one in the first place, online sites become a much easier way to tune into news and entertainment. There’s no friction to watching AM to DM, as long as you have a Twitter account—and as that’s their target audience anyway, this strategy bodes well for potential viewership.

While there are initial flaws and possibilities, it’s too early to see if AM to DM can grow into a unique morning show. It’s also not the only entry into the field of new media talk shows. Director and producer Kelly Kitagawa is leading a new show called Think About It, a “late night styled think piece show for millennials.” The production team is all college-aged women, most of whom are women of color. The teaser was released on Sunday, but the team is currently raising money to produce a full 9-episode series. Similar to AM to DM, the focus of the show is on presenting a different perspective than is usually seen in mainstream media.

There’s definitely a stronger sense of scrappiness with Think About It than AM to DM: it’s produced by independent college students rather than a multimedia company, it’s lower to the ground in terms of audience engagement (especially with funding needs), and it’s focused on exploring specific questions relevant to young people instead of a general look at the news. However, it won’t start streaming until November, so it’s too early to judge what the final product will look like.

Like I’ve written about before, I have a particular love for projects made by and for young people. It’ll be interesting to see the way the talk show and news landscape will be changed by an influx in younger creators, especially since these shows have had a recent surge in popularity and relevance. Right now, it’s unclear if it’ll make much of a difference at all, but I doubt it: new voices have the power to make chance, and they always use it.